Strikers in Sudan Push Military To Relinquish Power

Published May 29, 2019

Strikers in Sudan Push Military To Relinquish Power

Chanting anti-government slogans, workers lined up outside the upscale al-Waha shopping center in downtown Khartoum, demanding an end to the country’s 30-year military rule.

“Our martyrs lost their lives,” they shouted, referring to the dozens of people killed since December in Sudan’s revolution. “We can lose our jobs.”

Tuesday was the first day of a two-day nationwide strike called by opposition leaders demanding that Sudan’s military junta step down from power. The junta took power in April following the ouster of longtime president Omar al-Bashir after months of street protests.

Bashir had ruled for nearly 30 years and was accused of brutality and corruption.

An alliance of unions, professional organizations, and political parties called the strike. Talks between the alliance and the military council, which took power in an April coup, collapsed earlier this month after soldiers attacked peaceful demonstrators in the city, killing several and wounding hundreds.

The talks had stalled over whether civilians or generals would have control of a sovereign council meant to run the country for the next three years before elections.

With talks deadlocked, leaders of Sudan’s protest movement said they are escalating their pressure on the military, starting with the strike.

Around the nation, workers in various sectors posted photos of themselves on social media holding signs supporting the strike, including oil workers, dentists, sugar processing employees, cement factory workers, and veterinarians.

Numerous international flights to Sudan were also cancelled as aviation employees threatened to strike.

The broad support for the protest was despite the rejection of the strike by of the opposition Umma Party, a member of the opposition alliance, which had raised fears of a split in the civilian movement.

Throughout Khartoum, most businesses appeared shuttered, except for small stores selling basic necessities and petrol stations.

Members of the military council earlier vowed to fire any striking government workers.

Video circulated on social media Tuesday appeared to show uniformed security forces arresting staff of an electricity utility. Sudanese electricians had otherwise downed their tools, but said they would ensure power supply to necessary services such as hospitals.

The Sudan Professionals Association, a leading member of the opposition alliance, also accused members of the military of entering the Central Bank and attempting to force employees to work.

SPA spokesman Amjed Fareed condemned the arrests, which he described as “illegitimate.”

“The military council have to see the will of the Sudanese people, and accept it, and implement its previous commitment of handing over the power to a civilian government,” he said.

Fareed added if the military does not hand power to civilians after the strike ends Wednesday, the opposition alliance will call for further action.